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up but why. bill nye, the science guy, takes on global warming scoffer mark morano. >> this will be the hottest two decades in recorded history. >> bill nye has a bunch of scary predictions. >> plus the b word. bipartisan. everybody is talking about hands across the aisle in washington. do they really want to sever them? >> they are going to create people to come together on this and get it done. >> none of us want to see taxes on middle class folks go up. >> the president is very determined to try to prevent us from going over the fiscal cliff. >> those three guys are here live. and the man who shut down the government under bill clinton. what newt gingrich thinks it will take to avoid that happening again. >>> plus one of my personal heroes, the fastest man in the history of planet earth. ja ma jamaican sprinter usain bolt revealing a talent you may not know he has. ♪ let's get together and feel all right ♪ >> this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening. our big story tonight, you are so hot, america. i mean that literally. the temperature was a balmy 60
, by standing at the crossroads of science and the humanities, connecting creativity with technology, and combining leaps of imagination with feats of engineering to produce new devices that consumers hadn't even thought of. >> thank you for coming. we're gonna make some history together today. >> if you had to pick a day where it all came together, january 9, 2007, is not a bad one. jobs is in san francisco at the macworld conference in full pitchman mode as he unveils his latest product to the faithful. >> these are not three separate devices. this is one device. [cheers and applause] and we are calling it iphone. >> it is not only a remarkable achievement but a validation of everything that jobs believed in: if you made and controlled all of your own hardware and all of your own software, you could integrate all of your products and all of your content seamlessly into one digital hub. and no one but steve jobs had thought of it. >> this is something microsoft couldn't do 'cause it made software but not the hardware. it's something sony couldn't do 'cause it made a lot of devices,
family and friends, everything that you love all in the name of science. >>> "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with me. i'm carol costello. this should be interesting. speaker john boehner meets this morning with house republicans who are angry at his new pitch to raise $800 billion in tax revenue in the fiscal cliff negotiations. president obama has said there will be no deal unless taxes are raised on the wealthiest americ americans. but staunch conservatives don't want any kind of new taxes. that's where speaker boehner's job gets really tough. on piers morgan tonight newt gingrich said if all else fails, go over the cliff. >> i think that no deal is better than a bad deal. i think going off this cliff is less dangerous than letting things build up for a year or two years to an even bigger cliff. i think that the president clearly has staked out a position of nonseriousness. and i think that it's very difficult for the house republicans right now to find any practical way to get his attention. so, he just won an election. he is feeling very goo
people sort of live those years? >> absolutely. medical science has been so great. you mentioned novartis earlier. they're on the cutting edge of figuring out therapies that will work for people like me. so, for example, in my treatment, the first medicine i took called. >> glivac wasn't working the way i wanted it to. i changed to the next generation drug and it worked very well. it has given me what is called the molecular response, which means i no longer have any bad white blood cells that can be detected in my body down to the molecular level. that's the type of response that we want to reach and hope to maintain. >> you know in the three years since being diagnosed, what has been your biggest breakthrough personally or with respect to treatment? and how the treatments happened. >> i think personally once people found out i had leukemia, it made me a lot more human to people. when you're a successful athlete, people think you can do anything at anytime. and when they find out you're susceptible to the same things that every other ordinary person is susceptible to, it kind of humanize
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, with the perfect vehicle that's just right for you, no matter which list you're on. [ santa ] ho, , ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 c250 for $349 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. at your local music is a universal langue. but when i was in an accident. i was worried the health care system spoke a language all i own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. d tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million ericans. that's health in numbebers. unitedhealthcare. ♪ >> all right. we've got the adp report on private sector employment. only 118,000 jobs created in november. that's in the the private sector, okay? however, clearly that was affected by the big storm, sa y sandy. should have been much higher and will have been much higher w
. >> clayton: in new york city, women waiting until they're 50 to get married or have kids, beyond science or-- >> right, right. >> clayton: is that a problem? and is marriage the traditional idea of marriage suffering because women want to go further and further into the workplace? >> the idea of traditional marriage is suffering for lot of reason. the article, wasn't the whole kit and caboodle, one aspect that i was passing on, if you will. there's certainly more to the issue, the purpose of my book, how to choose a husband. this was sort after teaser. but the whole attitude for marriage in general, for young people in particular is such a negative one and that's really the premise that i'm concerned about because when you start out thinking so negatively and taught things like never depend on a man and postpone marriage as long as possible. not that there's anything wrong with postponing it, but with that attitude you're probably going to have a self-fulfilling prophesy, but turn it around. this is a good thing. marriage, family-- >> governor huckabee on our show disagreed a little. >> oka
. north korea denies having a nuclear weapons prom but says they do plan to launch one for science and research purposes. >>> now there was violence and clashes between the police and demonstrators who broke through the bashed wire -- barbed wire around that building. protestors are angry about what they call a power grabby the newly elected president and a new constitution which they say rolls back the rights of women, religious minorities and others. >>> in washington republicans are split on how to avoid the fiscal cliff. ktvu house smoker john boehner could be facing an uphill battle within his own -- >> reporter: speaker boehner -- certainly talk here that some republicans could revolt if speaker boehner caves to pressure from the white house to raise tax rates on the wealthiest 2% of americans. and while he's certainly had not agreed to that some are promising to block it. tea party favorite jim says giving into democrats to avoid the fiscal cliff is a temporary solution he's not willing to support. >> republicans should not be conceding the federal government needs more mone
's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. we have important breaking news. nbc news is reporting u.s. officials say their worst fears have been confirmed the syrian military has loaded chemical weapons inside bombs. nbc says those same officials say bashar al assad's forces are awaiting final order to use those loaded missiles against syria's own people. this video posted online, which we can't independently verify, purports to show syrian missiles that have been modified to carry chemical and biological weapons. obviously, this is a sober development in a situation that seems to be getting worse by the day. pentagon correspondent barbara starr joins me along with cnn contributor and former cia officer bob baer and on the phone fran townsend. barbara, i know you're working to confirm this nbc report. how much would this change the situation? if u.s. military is going to act to prevent assad from gassing his own people, it would seem, if they loaded this stuff into weapons, the time to do it would be at hand. >> right now i can t
another crack at that science question. clarify an answer he gave to "gq" when he was asked about the age of the earth. remember, senator rubio took a little grief, saying that he was not qualified to answer the question, calling it, quote, one of life's great mysteries. remember, i'm not a scientist, man, the whole thing. yesterday, mike, i guess you spoke to him as part of the "playbook" breakfast and you gave him a chance to explain that answer. let's listen. >> how old do you think the earth is? >> first of all, the answer i gave was trying to make the same point the president made a few years ago, and that is there is no scientific debate on the age of the earth. i mean, it's established it. pretty definitively. at least 4.5 billion years old. i was referring to a theological debate which is a pretty healthy debate. >> mike, what did you come away with talking to marco rubio yesterday? >> people in the room came away thinking that he was really smooth, really on his game. and this is an example of that. he had that very clumsy sort of dismissive answer when he was asked by "gq" befor
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. i have obligations. cute tobligations, but obligations.g. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> we're keeping an eye on dow component boeing. right now the stock is up 23 cents, .33%. one of its new dreamliner jets making an emergency landing. regulators are order rg the entire fleet of 787s to be inspected for fuel line issues. some teething problems perhaps or is this something more serious for the company? our phil lebeau is taking flight for us today in chicago. >> most people i've talked with in the industry believe this is more a case of teething problems as boeing continues
and science and technology. >> yeah, absolutely. that's one of the big things is we want to show how to do science and engineering on the show and we want to make it fun. a lot of this science shows, ten minute noose them, you fall asleep or whatever. that's one of the reasons we blow stuff up, we launch rockets, because we've got to get this next generation of kids interested in doing science engineering and math. >> brian: i still can't get through a whole episode of "electric company." steve, you remember we got in trouble for saying red neck on television? >> steve: right. >> brian: we got written up how numb we were to the people in the south. you're saying red neck is misunderstood. >> completely misunderstood. look up the history of the word. nowhere in its history was it used as derogatory term. it's only been in the last few decades that that's used on tv. in the south, it really is a term of endearment, if you think about it. it's hard work sharecroppers who had to be resourceful. everything they had was on the farm. if something broke, they had to fix it. when we moved the germa
for those living near the coast. bill nye the science guy is going the break it down. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. ♪ begin. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. that was me... the day i learned i had to start insulin for my type 2 diabetes. me... thinking my only option was the vial and syringe dad used. and me... discovering once-daily levemir® flexpen. flexpen® is prefilled. doesn't need refrigeration for up to 42 days. no drawing from a vial. dial the exact dose. inject by pushing a button. flexpen® is insulin delivery... my way. levemir® (insulin detemir [rdna origin] injection) is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes and is not recommended to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. do not use levemir® if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. the most common side effect is lo
an extension of science and technology, but i wanted to know what it meant to us, to humanity, to us then and to generations in the future, and i wasn't sure, but all i knew is that the world and the earth and the small part of the universe that i was privileged to see was not an accident, that there is a creator of this universe. and i had the opportunity, a few others have to sit on god's front porch and see a small part of it. and that's what i came home w. the science and technology is obsolete the next day, but the spirit, the meaning, and what neil just said a minute ago, it proved that period of time proved that individually and collectively as a nation we dedicate ourselves to a cause, there is nothing, nothing absolutely that we can't do. all we've got to do is decide to do it, whether it's go to the moon or solve the world crisis, forget off this financial cliff, or whatever, we have to be bold, be bold. bill: thank you, gene. really appreciate that. >> god bless. bill: check it out. job well done. check it out. fly me in the moon here on the fox news channel 9:00 eastern t
inventive mind. for the last look. a political science professor likes to point out that in democratic nations highways are full of twists and turns to accommodate property and people. in autocratic they are straight because leaders can bulldoze whatever is in the way to get to a straight line. take a look at this interesting twist on that rule. the builders of this highway in china built their road in a straight line but as you can see the road has a house right in the middle of it. the homeowner refused to budge so they built around him. remember in the run up to the beijing olympics, the authorities tore down houses with abandon. perhaps times are changing in china. on the other hand it could be a fluke. my only remaining question is where is the family's mailbox. the answer is a, the vatican has been a permanent observer state of the u.n. since 1964. the holy sea has full rights in the body, the representative can make speeches, take part in debates. he can do anything except vote. thanks to all of you for being part of my program. i'll see you next week. >>> hello, everyone, i'm d
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> you're watching cnbc's "squawk on the street" live from the financial capital of the world. the opening bell set to ring in just under two minutes or so. if you want to play the history game looking at the history of the month of december for the markets, some call it meaningless but it is basically the second best month of the year after april. 23 of the past 28 decembers have been up. average of 1.5%. since '90, up 2%. not an insignificant -- santa claus is for real many times. >> many of us have to commit. we're not allowed to own individual stocks but it's uniform gift to minors time. you have to make a contribution. i don't know whether you guys do it. it's a great way to put money away for your kids. that contribution is due now. there are a lot of contributions that are due that you remember to put money to work. in an environment where not people put money to work and people aren't doing anything, you get an influx of retail money. you have to co
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. "are you a cool mom?" i'm gonna find out. [ female announcer ] swiffer wetjet's pads are better than ever. now they have the scrubbing power of mr. clean magic eraser so you don't have to get down on your hands and knees to scrub away tough, dried-on stains. hey, do you guys think i'm "momtacular" or "momtrocious"? ♪ [ female announcer ] swiffer. now with the scrubbing power of mr. clean magic eraser. >>> for many conservatives the period since their presidential defeat has been a little rough, to say the least. there's been talk of postmortems, autopsies, colonoscopies, and now even friendly fire within the party itself as it tries to negotiate an approach toward the fiscal cliff. fox news, with all its stunned punditry on election night is not amused. the network confirms karl rove will only be allowed on air after producers receive permission. ditto, dick morris, the republican cheerleader still waiting to the romney/ryan call. gentlemen, don't sit there waiting in ve
's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. i wish my patits could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of thesrisk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup in their arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe crestor. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. [ female announcer ] crestor is not right for everyone. like people with liver disease or women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. tell your doctor about other medicines you're taking. call your doctor rht away if you have muscle pain or weakness, feel unusually tired, have loss of appetite, upper belly pain, dark urine or yellowing of skin or eyes. these could be signs of rare but serious sideeffects. ♪ is your cholesterol at goal? alk to your doctor aut crestor. [ female announcer ] if you can't afford your medication, astrazeneca may be able to help. >> laura: in th
: democrats to feed the stamp act, science, technology, engiering, and mathematics. immigrants into this country who deserve it and to we desperately want to have your while we throw open our borders and our airports to people who are, for the most part, the majority of those illegal immigrants are not even high-school educated, lacks skills, like education. my go. and they do so rejecting that law, that bill and prevent it from becoming law because they want to have a lotte. for crying out loud. the absurditiompound themselves. >> in general we have to recognize that the individual entrepreneur with special skills and contributions to american produce all the jobs, and they are the ones who are getting rich, who are punished by any increase in marginal tax rates. the already rich -- lou: what about the young man woman in this country who is not an entrepreneur, is not a big shot, is not in middle management in a big corporation. theyon a break. they won an opportunity. they want to live the american dream. why can't the publicans talk to hem? >> i hink that they are being tal
happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? ♪ i have obligations. cute tobligations, but obligations.g. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> welcome back, everybody, on this friday morning. the futures are still hanging in there. we're looking at the futures just slightly lower at this point. it looks like the s&p futures are down about two points below fair value but, of course, we do have the jo
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we'll kick off opening bell in a minute in a half. stocks had good action in shanghai overnight. a four-week high. the only disappointment has been data in europe. the scuttlebutt that some members wanted to cut which has put pressure on the euro today. >> german market up twice what we're up and i think people are shaking their heads that netherlands could be up. we don't see any data whatsoever that europe is doing better but belief that 2013 can't be as bad as 2012. german numbers were not good at all. it's a puzzle. >> we did get an earthquake in northeastern japan overnight. 7.3 is serious. looks like we dodged a bullet on that front as well. doesn't look like there's any damage as a result of that. >> i thought there would be a tremendous rebuilding effort in fukushima. it didn't happen because the ground is contaminated. the first question they asked over there were nuclear reactors apparently safe is the early word. >> we walk in on monday
has fallen dramatically. there is no scientific relation in social science between the number of guns and the homicide rate. we've seen, there is just -- >> what a load of absolute -- >> -- virginia has gone up dramatically. >> what a load of claptrap. >> we have to be clear about this. he's talking about virginia. the death rate in virginia has gone up and i think people don't understand all that. in the united states, we have some agreement on what we can do and i think we need to talk about that. there's some new polling by mayors against illegal guns that show that huge majorities of gun owners and americans believe that we should have background checks on all gun sales and let me tell you, states that do that save lives. and we need to do the things i think that are possible, the things that are going to make a big difference. we know that in america, if we do things like background checks on things like better tools for psychiatrists, we can stop these killings. not all of them, because countries in europe that have these types of things, countries around the world and states th
-ray, please! [ nurse ] i'm a nurse. i believe in the power of science and medicine. but i'm also human. and i believe in stacking the deck. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, energy is being produced to power our lives. while energy development comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing generations of cleaner-burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. with scottrader streaming quotes, any way you want. fully customize it for your trading process -- from thought to trade, on every screen. and all in real time. which makes it just like having your own trading floor, right at your fingertips. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. try our easy-to-use scottrad
, no matter how wily... or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> about four minutes left. another one of those days where it was clear that wall street is fixated on washington and what's going on with the fiscal cliff talks. they were still public today. here's where the president started speaking to the business round table and where we learned also that those 40 republicans part of this bipartisan group that would be open to new ideas on the fiscal cliff talks. of the dow, the best performers and worst performers today, the full-ti financials higher led by bank of america. nasdaq, we need to highlight this, was lower, down 20 points today. why? because of apple. apple had one of its worst days. we highlighted this earlier. something very archean called the death cross, the 50-day moving average crossed below the 200-day moving average. what does that mean? just means it could be going lower from here. down 6% on apple today. the yield of the ten-year went lower. as they were buying stocks, they were a
? the answer is part of our science roundup online. hari sreenivasan has the details. >> sreenivasan: the image resembles a lite-bright time lapse. find those pictures and our conversation with a software developer who set out to visualize the 24-hour cycle of urban public transit systems. that's on our homepage. an international telecommunications conference in dubai aims to set new rules for the internet. what's at stake? we take a look in the rundown. and on making sense, economics correspondent paul solman argues both sides of the capital gains tax debate. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. judy? >> woodruff: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributio
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. now we need a little bit more... [ male announcer ] at humana, we understand the value of quality time and personal attention. which is why we are proud to partner with health care professionals who understand the difference that quality time with our members can make... that's a very nice cake! ohh! [ giggles ] [ male announcer ] humana thanks the physicians, nurses, hospitals, pharmacists and other health professionals who helped us achieve the highest average star rating among national medicare companies... and become the first and only national medicare advantage company to achieve a 5-star rating for a medicare plan... your efforts result in the quality of care and service we're able to provide... which means better health outcomes... and more quality time to share with the ones who matter most. i love you, grandma! [ male announcer ] humana. ♪ but they haven't experienced extra strength bayer advanced aspirin. in fact, in a recent surve
. and the first thing i thought was because we are not teaching them sciences or computer or technology. much of it had to do with up can't even answer a phone. you don't have social skills. you can't say please and thank you and do as you are told. what? >> i would like to see that report. i was just talking to someone that does manufacturing who works so many manufacturing policy in the government that said some of the numbers are overblown. some of those numbers, in fact are. i think you had someone from the consulting group saying? of those numbers are because -- you know, employers are not training and are not paying up for the skills. >> some of the argument has been that our education is so dismal we are not teaching people -- hold the phone for a minute here. dana bash from capitol hill is joining me. i heard your question. it was right on point. it was, i believe, question number one for the speaker. which was -- are you willing to start negotiating on the numbers of that top taxation issue between 35 and 39.5. you didn't get your answer. >> reporter: i didn't get my answer. but -- c
before the end of the year. >> folks, this is not hard. this ain't rocket science. it would take 15 minutes from the time the decision is made by the speaker of the house to pass and make permanent the middle class tax cut. the president would probably have me spin up to the hill to bring the bill down for him to sign. it can be done like that. it is not complicated. >> vice president joe biden did not waiver on the white house's position. it's all about the top tax rates. >> every serious economist i have spoken to, left, right, and center, knows you have to do something about revenue and rates. you can't get there from here without affecting people at this table. or fooling around with the mortgage deductions. you can't get there without the rates being affected. >> the white house is not backing down on rates. the president sent his legislative affairs director to meet with the republicans on the hill. he told him the white house is not moving on rates. a source close to the negotiations said once republicans move on rates they can get a deal very quickly. that sounds like the pr
chief science correspondence robert bazel has the story. >> reporter: with the season starting early, children's hospital in memphis is feeling the first wave. >> we've seen more than 200 cases of flu in the hospital this week and we're admitting eight to ten kids a day. we expect it to accelerate, to get worse before it gets better in the next few weeks. >> reporter: schoolchildren are not only vulnerable, they play a big role in spreading the flu. >> when you have all those kids getting together, they tend to pass the virus back and forth, they all get sick in the school and bring it home into the community. >> the way to protect those people is to vaccinate the people around them. so vaccinating more children reduces the risk of older people in the community of getting the flu. >> reporter: health officials are urging everyone, adults and children over 6 months old, to get vaccinated, and officials emphasized there's plenty to go around and it's never too late to get it. for "today," robert bazell, nbc news, new york. >>> up next on "today," hear why one washington lawmakers wants
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. looking for news after a relatively light news day yesterday, you are in luck. multibillion dollar commission between mining and oil and gas. a major western bank starting to deglobalize. the president will speak on the fiscal cliff. what a day shaping up this morning. there's a look at s&p on the top of your screen. opening bell in a moment here at the big board. a limited partnership formed by marathon. celebrating the recent ipo. over at the nasdaq, a limited liability company celebrating the recent listing. >> fabulous company for people looking for high yield in the 401(k). they can't use it because of the tax break. >> very nice. a couple interesting notes about today. the anniversary of greenspan's speech on this date back in 1996 in which the dow closed at 6,437. >> a classic buy opportunity that was. >> when it hit 6400 in '09 it was a good opportunity too. >> yesterday s&p closes at 1,407. one year earlier 1,409. lost two points over the course of the year. >> it does look like noth
change between natural gas and coal is still somewhat a question mark. it looks based on most science we have now cleaner than coal, but we just don't know. we don't know a lot about the local impacts and how long these prices stay low or how long the wells last. there's a lot wi don't know about it, and it's moving so quickly. i think that's why you see a lot of of this. >> there's a lot of fear. >> and you're someone who is familiar with this. you live in upstate. you consulted for the oil and gas industry and you're a toxicologist, right? what are the fears you hear, and what's yue feeling about how people are understanding the process? >> people are not understanding the process at at all. the information is out there. the industry has been doing this for a while. they have the information, but the problem is a lot of people don't believe what the industry says. so even if the industry -- >> which is not ridiculous. let me just say it for the record, right? this is just as a basic kind of -- i think you're right. what ends up happening is you get this debate, right? the natural gas c
this fiction science instead of science fiction. this is completely baseless. there's not a shred of evidence in favor of it. but it sure is a lot of fun to be worrying about the end of the world. hollywood knows that, too. as far as the mayan calendar is considered, alex, this is a complete misunderstanding of how calendars work. look, we faced this kind of calendar cliff every year when on december 31 you run out of pages on your calendar. you don't think it's the end of the world. you just think it's time to go to the stationery store and buy a new calendar. we are according to some experts coming to an end of one of the mayan's long cycle of days. but they themselves the living descendants of the mayan say a new cycle will begin. >> the buru four times the size of earth will come close to earth and cause all kinds of disasters. any truth there? >> absolutely not. the buru as it's called is a completely made up planet from the name of an ancient sumerian god. can you imagine, alex, if there really were a planet that big coming close to us now in december? is there any chance that you and a
the science behind every shape, size and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. we're trying to trick the brain into seeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital patterns re-create shapes already found in nature and 3d layering creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. but developers already have one eye on tomorrow. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is it. >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflage, he's invisible. >> my body's gone. >> reporter: how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make believe. the military has seen this quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even conceal most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper hiding in a field or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could
and indicted it will never exonerate you. it's considered inadmissible, it's considered junk science. i would advice those kids not to take it. i would go a step further with the mother. i'd tell her to start naming names. if she has specific individuals who she feels are holding things back, like tamara pointed back, they may or may not be and they don't have an obligation to reveal it put some social paper on those individual, put their names in the letter, put it out there publicly. >> that is a risky thing to do. now you're risking opening yourself up to liability or defamation if you name people that are potentially involved in a crime and it didn't occur. martha: i think back to natalee holloway and her mother and how strong here she felt that that young man, joran van der sloot knew what happened, and the people who were with them had more information than they were giving. as a parent it's impossible to imagine when you know that all these people were with her. they went to a bar together, they might know a little bit about who else was there. i have to believe, keith, that these poli
him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. every human being is unique. and there is one store that recognizes it. the sleep nuer store. the only place in the world you' find the extraordinarily comfortabl sleep number experience. an exclusive collection of innovations that totally individualize your sleep. perfectly comfortable pillows that adjust your size and shape. temperature-balancing bedding. dual warmth comforters. all designed around the sleep number bed: a bed with dual-air technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs. each of your bodies. in the name of human individualy: the sleep number collection. discover how our sleep professionals can individualize your sleep experience. exclusively at one of our 400 sleep number stores nationde. sleep number. comfort individualized. this holiday season, give the gift that's magical: the innovative airfit adjustable pilillow at special 30% savings. now we need a little bit more... [ male announcer ] humana, we und
is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> financial capital of the world. we're counting down the opening bell on a tuesday morning. we should note the move in the commodities market this morning. look at gold for instance. breaking 1,700 at one point. one-month lows breaking near term support of 1700. oil also down a buck on wti more than at this point. >> we do have that euro that's been hanging in. some people think it's because of the euro. other people feel that everything goes down in a fiscal cliff situation. i mean, commodities are saying we're going to go over the cliff. that's what i think. >> it's interesting. there are these recent reports tallying how many american eagle gold coins americans are buying. is that the ultimate safe haven trade. if americans are buying gold coins in record numbers, the strongest sales since 1998, and it's not just seasonality here. it's interesting. >> i own some. i own silver. >> silver and gold. >> you can buy silver and gold. you can actually -- there's a big ma
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